YoungHort group misses out on show garden

YoungHort has had an application turned down for an RHS Chelsea Flower Show artisan garden themed on promoting horticulture as a career for young people.

The garden was to be a collaborative effort with Lydia MacKay one of the designers. The theme was based around trying to get more young people into horticulture.

YoungHort director Jamie Butterworth said: "It's probably better in the long run for us. We did it as a group garden but at the end of the day we're better off starting at a smaller show than building at Chelsea as a collective. It would have been too much."

He added: "Support from the industry has been incredible and the Chelsea management team was very helpful with the information they sent back. Feedback was mainly about our inexperience, which is fair enough.

"We had none collectively so to do Chelsea would have been very risky. We're hoping to do the garden at another show, but we don't know which one yet.

"It could have gone disastrously wrong, but we still have the talent in YoungHort to put together very good show gardens."

Several suppliers in the trade were ready to offer support, including Wyevale Nurseries and the David Colegrave Foundation.

Chelsea 2015

- Darren Hawkes is set to design the Brewin Dolphin garden.

- Chris Beardshaw, Jo Thompson and three other women designers are believed to be involved.

- Adam Frost will return for Homebase

- The Rich brothers will be back for Bord na Mona.

- Hugo Bugg is not believed to be returning for Royal Bank of Canada.


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