WRAP to review compost standard BSI PAS 100

The nationally recognised standard for high-grade compost, BSI PAS 100, is being reviewed in line with changes within the recycling industry.

The results, which will cover everything from product preparation to monitoring and traceability, will be released towards the end of the summer.

The review is being undertaken by WRAP (Waste & Resources Action Programme), BSI British Standards and the Association for Organics Recycling.

They will supported by a steering group comprising regulators (the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) and the Environment Agency), technical specialists and industry representatives.

BSI PAS 100, which was first published in 2002 and then updated in 2005, is designed to give purchasers peace of mind about product quality.

All compost produced to the specification must meet minimum quality criteria to ensure its suitability for use as a soil improver, mulch, turf dressing or ingredient in other products.

WRAP director of retail and organics Dr Richard Swannell said: "Given recent rapid increases in compost production, it is vital that compost users have confidence in the product.  BSI PAS 100 provides the benchmark for product quality, and this review should ensure that customer confidence remains high. "  

The new draft of BSI PAS 100 will be available for public consultation by spring 2009 and the final document is expected to be published in late summer 2009.


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