Study shows many Britons fail to name UK apple varieties

Many Britons are unable to identify home-grown apple varieties, research by the National Trust has shown.

More than half - 53 per cent - of people in the UK eat an apple each week and almost a quarter (24 per cent) of Britons who eat apples enjoy eating them because they can buy home-grown varieties.

Yet 41 per cent of people who eat apples find it difficult to pick out British-grown varieties. For example, 61 per cent of adults thought the Granny Smith was grown in UK soil - in fact, it originates from Australia.

Similarly, almost a quarter of people (23 per cent) thought that Pink Lady was grown in the UK.

The survey also showed that 68 per cent of people who eat apples enjoy them for their juicy, crunchy texture and 40 per cent for their convenience, with nine per cent even eating the core.

Yet 25 per cent of adults are put off apples because they turn brown as they start to eat the flesh and a quarter (25 per cent) of 18-24-year-olds do not eat apples at all.

National Trust 'How to Eat an Apple' guide

The National Trust, as part of its Food Glorious Food campaign that celebrates local and seasonal food, has launched a "How to Eat an Apple" guide to encourage people to buy British-grown varieties. The information includes:

- The British apple calendar, so people can make the most of the UK harvest.

- The different apple flavours and how best to enjoy them.

- New recipes and ways of eating British apples.

- How to preserve our harvest across the year.

National Trust director general Fiona Reynolds said: "British apples are now being harvested and we're spoilt for choice with flavours. Whether it's the rich, sweet Cox or the nutty Egremont Russet, we urge everyone to enjoy home-grown varieties throughout the day.

"We need more people to help protect our orchards - 70 per cent of apples bought in the UK are imported. This must change."


Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Sign up now
Already registered?
Sign in

Read These Next

Has vertical farming passed a peak on the 'hype cycle'?

Has vertical farming passed a peak on the 'hype cycle'?

Several senior industry figures sounded a note of caution on the potential of urban farms at last week's GreenTech international trade show in Amsterdam (12-14 June).

How can growers benefit by supporting agroforestry?

How can growers benefit by supporting agroforestry?

Agroforestry has the potential to deliver on a range of policy objectives in England, according to a new report from the Woodland Trust and the Soil Association.

How should perceived shortcomings in Defra's farming policy plans be addressed?

How should perceived shortcomings in Defra's farming policy plans be addressed?

The Government needs to provide much more detail on its post-Brexit farming policy if its twin aims of increasing farm competitiveness and enhancing the environment are to be met, according to a new report published this week by the parliamentary Environment, Food & Rural Affairs Committee.


Follow us on:
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • Google +

Horticulture Week Top UK FRUIT PRODUCERS

See our exclusive ranking of fruit producers by annual turnover. 

Horticulture Jobs
More Horticulture Jobs

Pest & Disease Tracker bulletin 

The latest pest and disease alerts, how to treat them, plus EAMU updates, sent direct to your inbox.

Sign up here

Professor Geoffrey Dixon

GreenGene International chair Geoff Dixon on the business of fresh produce production
 

Read Professor Geoffrey Dixon