Staff losses loom at Eden Project as attraction looks for cost savings

The Eden Project is set to layoff staff because of the state of the economy. Although visitor numbers rose last year, they fell six per cent to 1.028 million in 2009 before rising 0.1 per cent to 1,001,774 in 2011, according to the Association of Leading Visitor Attractions.

Eden's numbers peaked at 1,832,482 in 2002, a year after the £90m horticulture attraction's opening, and have remained above one million ever since. Founder Tim Smit's initial estimate for visitors was 750,000.

Eden Project representative Ben Foster said: "Like many organisations, the Eden Project has felt the effects of the tough economic climate. We have considered how best to get through this challenging time and as part of this we have been examining our operations and costs. This is likely to mean that a small number of redundancies will need to be made and a consultation programme has started."

He added: "This process is continuing and we are unable to give an exact figure on the number of jobs that will be lost until that is complete. The consultation is due to be completed later this month."

The Eden Project employs around 492 core staff and 200 seasonal employees as well as 150 volunteers.


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