SRUC calls for samples of Botrytis infestation to help investigate resistance

Botrytis cinerea filaments - image: Scot Nelson
Botrytis cinerea filaments - image: Scot Nelson

Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC) is seeking samples from growers of any crops infected with Botrytis in order to investigate fungicide resistance.

Those who take part will be informed of the efficacy of fungicides on the strain supplied.

According to the college, the resistance status and efficacy of fungicides in many UK horticultural crops is almost completely unknown.

The new project, funded by the Chemicals Regulation Directorate (CRD) and Defra, is seeking to address this and is developing molecular tools to detect resistance problems in the Botrytis species complex on horticultural crops. It is in its first of three years.

Samples, together with a submission form (pdf), should be sent to:

The Crop Clinic
SRUC
West Mains Road
Edinburgh
EH9 3JG

Samples should be sent by ordinary parcel post, loosely wrapped in newspaper and contained in a plastic bag.

For more information please contact Fiona Burnett on 0131 535413 ofiona.burnett@sruc.ac.uk.


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