Riococo launches coir-based blocks

US-Sri Lankan growing media supplier Riococo launched its coir-based substrates onto the UK market last week, saying its block design gives growers a more durable product.

Shan Halamba, chief executive of parent company Ceyhinz Link International, said the blocks are coarser at the bottom. "Otherwise the porosity might break down after a year, so you have no air around the lower roots and they die," he said.

Riococo offers six grades of block, from a fine grade for tomato production to coarse mixes for ornamentals.

Riococo sells in more than 20 countries and its media, used in tomato-growing trials in Texas, yielded more than 100kg per square metre a year.


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