Retail plants

A guide to species and cultivars of popular plants for retail in garden centres, with supplier's tips on how to use and sell them.

Carex

Carex

Evergreen grasses and sedges provide year-round structure and move with the wind, Miranda Kimberley writes.

Disporum

Disporum

These elegant woodland plants produce leafy green stems and bell-shaped flowers, says Miranda Kimberley.

Tradescantia

Tradescantia

These unfussy plants offer a welcome splash of colour in the garden or as a houseplant, writes Miranda Kimberley.

Trollius

Trollius

With their papery blooms, these popular perennials are a welcome addition to borders, says Miranda Kimberley.


Rodgersia

Rodgersia

These versatile plants are described as 'bombproof' and 'wonderfully unfussy', Miranda Kimberley finds.

Verbascum

Verbascum

Fantastic spikes of flowers bring height, structure and colour to the garden border, writes Miranda Kimberley.

Agapanthus

Agapanthus

These exotic plants are easy to grow and a great addition to any garden in pots, beds or borders, says Miranda Kimberley.

Potentilla

Potentilla

These easy-to-grow plants provide a vibrant set of flower colours from hots to pastels, writes Miranda Kimberley.

Nemesia

Nemesia

With their bright blooms and nice petals these plants look like a bedding version of orchids, says Miranda Kimberley.

Senecio

Senecio

This diverse genus offers varieties that work well inside as well as outdoors in many sizes, says Miranda Kimberley.


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Anemone

Anemone

These uncomplicated plants produce beautiful flowers for most of the growing season, says Miranda Kimberley.

Helleborus

Helleborus

Customers keep coming back for these strong plants that offer colour when it is most needed, writes Miranda Kimberley.

Gaura

Gaura

These robust plants can repeat flower from April to October and nice foliage adds interest, says Miranda Kimberley.

Aster

Aster

Brightening up gardens in autumn, these daisies are seen as a gem in the gardener's arsenal, writes Miranda Kimberley.

Astrantia

Astrantia

Customers can be confident that these hardy, easy-to-grow plants will return the following year, Miranda Kimberley finds.

Maianthemum

Maianthemum

Showy spikes, lush leaves and sweet scent all help to sell these appealing plants, writes Miranda Kimberley.

Kniphofia

Kniphofia

These useful plants are persistent, need little attention and offer striking colour combinations, says Miranda Kimberley.

Paeonia

Paeonia

Stocking a wide range of these impressive flowers from early March until June can boost sales, Miranda Kimberley reports.

Narcissus

Narcissus

The range of colours and flowering times makes for cheerful and economic displays, Miranda Kimberley reports.

Papaver

Papaver

These compact, brightly coloured flowers can be very attractive for impulse sales, notes Miranda Kimberley.

Zantedeschia

Zantedeschia

These elegant plants feature a variety of striking flower shapes in a range of colours, writes Miranda Kimberley.

Colocasia

Colocasia

These dramatic tropical plants can be a food source but make great ornamental garden plants, notes Miranda Kimberley

Climbing roses

Climbing roses

Walls, trellises, pergolas and even trees can all be brightened up by these beautiful blooms, writes Miranda Kimberley.

Sisyrinchium

Sisyrinchium

This huge but slightly odd genus offers multiple choices for the rock garden or alpine house, says Miranda Kimberley.

Scaevola

Scaevola

This brilliant summer bedding plant has fan-shaped flowers that give it an elegant look, says Miranda Kimberley.

Hedging - what are the alternatives to box?

Hedging - what are the alternatives to box?

With box blight and box tree moth both posing problems, Miranda Kimberley looks at alternative planting choices.

Tiarella

Tiarella

Pretty flowers and striking leaves are behind the rising appeal of the foam flower, writes Miranda Kimberley.

Berkheya

Berkheya

These long-flowering thistle-like daisies are well worth a go for consistent interest in the border, writes Miranda Kimberley.