Plant variety rights applications up

The Community Plant Variety Office (CPVO), the European Union agency which manages plant variety rights covering the 27 member states, has received 1,749 applications for community plant variety rights during the first six months of 2013, an 19 per cent increase when compared to the same period of 2012.

CPVO received 810 applications for ornamentals, 491 for agricultural crops, 337 for vegetables and 111 for fruit varieties. Vegetables increased by 36 per cent (90 applications), followed by ornamentals by 16 per cent (112 applications) and fruit varieties ( 14 per cent, 14 applications)

Fees were lowered from 1 January 2013.  Numbers dropped by a similar amount in 2012.


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