Plant passport changes now include poinsettia and begonia

Plants, including finished plants of Euphorbia pulcherrima, Begonia, Ajuga, Crossandra, Dipladenia, Hibiscus, Mandevilla and Nerium oleander, must now be passported down to the final retailer.

A range of new plant health measures have into force. This was due to the European Commission adopting the Directive (EU) 2019/523. It updates the current plant health directive 2000/29/EC. Defra has now included this in English law (2019/1070). The changes are as follows:

As well as Euphorbia pulcherrima, Begonia, Ajuga, Crossandra, Dipladenia, Hibiscus, Mandevilla and Nerium oleander having to be passported down to the final retailer, Ficus is also included in the list but this is not being enforced, so Ficus remain as needing a passport only when being marketed for growing-on.

Changes to enhance the requirements against Bemisia tabaci (Bt) for the movement of plant material into the protected zones of Ireland, certain parts of Portugal, Sweden and UK:
Euphorbia pulcherrima (Poinsettia) cuttings without roots intended for planting;
Plants of Euphorbia pulcherrima, intended for planting, excluding seeds, there are a range of options that plants can meet:
originate in an area known to be free from Bt;
or no signs of Bt observed at the place of production during official inspections carried out at least once each three weeks during nine weeks prior to marketing;
or where Bt is found treatments have been applied and no Bt found during official inspections carried out weekly during the three weeks prior to marketing.
And, there is evidence that the above requirements have been met or for those plants at marketing with bracts or intended for direct sale to final consumer not involved in professional plant production, that the plants have been officially inspected and found free from Bt prior to their movement to retail point of
sale.
Plants of Begonia intended for planting, other than seeds, tubers and tubers, and plants of Ajuga, Crossandra, Dipladenia, Ficus, Hibiscus, Mandevilla and Nerium oleander, intended for planting, other than seeds must meet one of the following requirements:
that plants originate in an areas known to be free from Bt;
or no signs of Bt observed at the place of production during official inspections carried out at least once each three weeks during nine weeks prior to marketing;
or where Bt is found treatments have been applied and no Bt found during official inspections carried out weekly during the three weeks prior to marketing,
or there is evidence that the above requirements have been met or for those plants at marketing with bracts or intended for direct sale to final consumer not involved in professional plant production, that the plants have been officially inspected and found free from Bt prior to their movement to retail point of sale.

Juglans (Walnut) and Pterocarya (Wingnut) have been added to plant passporting when being moved to other growers for growing-on. They are host to Geosmithia morbida (Thousand cankers disease) and its vector Pityophthorus juglandis (Walnut Twig Beetle).

The Red Necked longhorn beetle, Aromia bungii has been added to prevent the movement and spread of the pest in the EU. It is a major pest of Prunus already subject to emergency measures.

Plants for planting of Cedrus (Cedar) are added to Pinus and have import and movement requirements in relation to the UK protected zone against Pine Processionary moth. The PZ code is: a15.1.


Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Sign up now
Already registered?
Sign in
Follow us on:
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • Google +
Horticulture Jobs
More Horticulture Jobs

Are you a landscape supplier?

Horticulture Week Landscape Project Leads

If so, you should be receiving our new service for Horticulture Week subscribers delivering landscape project leads from live, approved, planning applications across the UK.