Pershore apprentices start renovation works on historic garden

Students based at Pershore College, which is part of WCG (formerly Warwickshire College Group), have started renovation works on the Italianate Garden at Moreton Hall.

The Italianate Garden features an ornamental sundial, herbaceous borders, formal hedges, lawns, paving, steps and a water feature. There will also be work carried out on a small parterre which is visible on the approach to the hall. 

Works on the garden are expected to be completed in 2022, with more than 80 students and apprentices involved over the course of the development.

It is the first stage in a planned project to transform the expansive grounds around the hall, which are in need of restoration and, in some areas, require redesigning.

The grounds have been left unkempt following a fire which seriously damaged Moreton Hall in 2008. 

The Palladian-style mansion house is set to undergo a refurbishment to create a national hotel training school and boutique hotel, which will train people for the hospitality industry.

Matt Handy, Industrial Training Manager for Horticulture at Pershore College,  said: “We are able to engage apprentices from across all of our work-based learning areas with this wonderful project, as we look to restore the gardens to their original standard.

“Already we have had apprentices in surveying the area, researching planting plans, along with Italianate garden design and looking into other works of Moreton Hall’s original architect W.H Romaine-Walker. We plan to start restoring the boundary hedges of the Italianate Garden over the next few months.

“We’ve had great feedback from those involved so far. Everything they do on the site has a purpose, the range of tasks is diverse and they can see that they are contributing to a wider project with a clear end-goal. 

“After we complete the first phase, we are hoping to move on to another area of the garden in phase two, opening up the incredible view across the Avon Valley from the west lawn at the rear of the hall. Viewing a sunset from this location justifies without words why this location was chosen for the hall.”


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