Number of allotment disposal applications holds steady despite cuts

The number of allotment disposal applications has remained steady over the past year, according to the National Allotment Society, despite funding pressures faced by coucncils.

The society's PR and marketing manager Diane Appleyard said: "The applications count is pretty much steady. It might even have gone down slightly, but it's definitely not gone up."

The Department for Communities & Local Government published an allotments disposal guide earlier this month, leading to concerns about how often applications for disposals are happening, said Appleyard.

The purpose of the guide is to aid councils in deciding whether to apply for consent to dispose of allotment land and inform on how applications will be assessed.

Appleyard said: "When people are moved from plots that are being used, the land has to be replaced elsewhere. The plot holders get land in a different place, and normally compensation as well.

"In some cases they are unhappy about being moved, but in other instances things are resolved well."

Meanwhile, 10 times more people downloaded the National Allotment Society's flooding advice leaflet in February compared with downloads in January.

Recent flooding across the country has left allotment holders seeking advice where they can. Appleyard said councils and TV's The One Show have shown interest. "As long as the floods go, people should still have time to get their plots back into shape," she added.

The National Allotment Society currently has a position vacant for a National Secretary after the departure of Donna McDaid.


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