Notcutts doubles offer to train 10 students at Thrive

A new training bursary has been created at Thrive thanks to a donation in the name of the late Charles Notcutt who died in 2015.

Caroline Notcutt
Caroline Notcutt

The Charles Notcutt Memorial Bursary was launched in January 2016 to enable five students to complete our Award in Social and Therapeutic Horticulture.

More than 50 people applied for the bursary and Thrive shortlisted ten excellent candidates - in light of that Notcutts has agreed to fund all 10 places.

The award combines two days of teaching with an eight week period of accompanied self-directed learning. The bursary will cover the cost of 10 places on Thrive's specialist knowledge programme, followed by access to the award assignment. The ordinary combined cost of this is £550.

Thrive is a charity that uses gardening to help people living with disabilities or ill health, or those who are isolated, disadvantaged or vulnerable, at their four regional centres and in the community, by using plants and gardening to bring positive changes to their lives.

Damien Newman, Thrive's National Training, Education and Consultancy Manager, said: "More and more people from different backgrounds are deciding to embark upon a new career in social and therapeutic horticulture.

"We offer 'Step into Social and Therapeutic Horticulture' workshops that provide a great introduction and provide careers advice and connect people with opportunities to volunteer.

"And Thrive can help people who want to take their training further, or become professional horticultural therapists, to study courses that we run in collaboration with Coventry University and Pershore College.  In total around 700 people access our training programme each year."

Charles Notcutt's daughter Caroline Notcutt, who was one of the judges of Thrive's annual flower show in July, presented the charity with a cheque.

Newman added: "Thrive, alongside others in Green Care, the National Gardens Scheme who recently commissioned a report by The King's Fund; Gardens and Health: Implications for policy and practice, the Horticultural Trades Association and RHS have been promoting gardening for health and wellbeing, making connections with the medical profession and trying to get Public Health to recognise the value of Horticulture for health and wellbeing.

"More calls for doctors to 'prescribe gardening' mean we could see a huge demand for people who have knowledge of horticulture and have been trained to use horticulture as a therapy in the coming years."



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