London Wildlife Trust wins award for volunteering partnership

Conservation charity the London Wildlife Trust has won a Lord Mayor's Dragon Award for its partnership with the Mace Foundation, which helped boost community engagement in the capital's green spaces.

Pond dipping at Gunnersbury. Image: London Wildlife Trust
Pond dipping at Gunnersbury. Image: London Wildlife Trust

London Wildlife Trust is dedicated to protecting London's wildlife and wild spaces, improving lives for people in London by creating sustainable green spaces that improve wellbeing. Researchers from the Universities of Glasgow and Edinburgh have found that access to green spaces reduces the socioeconomic inequalities and mental well-being gap among urban dwellers.

The trust's winning partnership involved the establishment of a Volunteer Week, in which 500 Mace employees devoted time to practical upkeep of green spaces. The partnership continued and Mace employees regularly take part in skilled volunteering, as well as utilise the trust's reserves for training events.

Over the duration of the partnership, 1,500 Mace employees have volunteered to help improve community access to green spaces in 11 London boroughs.

The partnership means that the trust has benefited from the technical knowledge and access to Mace's contractors who improved facilities at the Rosendale Allotments, by building steps to allow safe access on site and de-silted a pond which is being used as a learning facility by a local Scout Centre.


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