London borough to roll out new biodiversity-rich floral "lawn"

Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea is to trial what it calls a new form of biodiverse floral lawn - the first time a public park has used this new form ground cover, it says.

Lionel Smith, an RHS-sponsored PhD student who is part of the borough’s grounds team is leading the project as part of his research, which looks at covering an area with suitable plants that contain no grass. They include daisy, bugle, bachelor's buttons and hawkweed.

Planting a public space with specially selected and researched plants would give him an insight into how people react to this non-traditional lawn, he said. Previously all his research was done on experimental plots at Reading University.

"Lawns are normally associated with closely trimmed grass but mine are, I believe, entitled to be called that too. They are not only beautiful and easy to maintain but environmentally friendly. It will be interesting to see how visitors to Avondale Park react."

Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea parks manager Barrie Maclaurin said: "We try to give residents great spaces and believe these flowering lawns, although experimental, have good potential and will be well received."

Plants are currently being propagated and grown in the borough’s nursery and will be planted in March 2013. The lawn should start flowering in late April and reach a peak in May but also carry through to June.


Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Sign up now
Already registered?
Sign in

Read These Next

Opinion... Healthy trees work harder for longer

Opinion... Healthy trees work harder for longer

UK satellite images after heavy rain show river estuaries engulfed by massive swirls of muddy-brown water extending out into the surrounding ocean blue. It is soil scoured from our mismanaged land because of Government policies that focus on food production at the expense of sustainability.

Horticulture careers - plugging the skills gap

Horticulture careers - plugging the skills gap

Bespoke apprenticeships and internal training are helping firms to get ahead in skills-shortage horticulture, says Rachel Anderson.

Sargent's solutions - how to turn the loss of a key member of staff into a positive

Sargent's solutions - how to turn the loss of a key member of staff into a positive

Losing a valued member of staff can be a positive opportunity for change rather than a disaster, Alan Sargent suggests.


Follow us on:
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • Google +

HORTICULTURE WEEK Custodian Awards

Find out more about the outstanding parks, gardens and arboricultural projects and teams that became our Custodian Award 2018 winners.

Horticulture Jobs
More Horticulture Jobs

Products & Kit Resources