Landscape Institute to broaden access to archive through move to Reading University museum

Image fom the sketchbook of Peter Shepheard, Landscape Institute archive at the University of Reading.
Work from leading landscape architects including Geoffrey Jellicoe, Michael Brown and Sylvia Crowe will be accessible to all after the Landscape Institute transferred its archive to Reading University.

The Landscape Institute (LI) archive is now at the Museum of English Rural Life (MERL), part of the university. 

The collection includes plans for the restoration of Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant’s Charleston farmhouse by Peter Shepheard, who also designed the landscape for London Zoo.

It also features the original plan for the park at Sydenham, South London when the Crystal Palace moved there from Hyde Park in the 1850s.

The LI has established a friends' group to support the museum in growing and sharing the collection.

Founder members include James Corner of Corner Field Operations, Robert Townshend of Townshend Landscape Architects, Jan Woudstra of the University of Sheffield, Marc Trieb at Berkeley , University of California, landscape architect Dominic Cole, past President of the Landscape Institute Hal Moggridge, Jenifer White of English Heritage and Dr Tony Kendle, the Foundation Director of the Eden Project. 

Other highlights of the collection include the drawings and professional papers of many leading landscape architects including the urban designer Michael Brown (Redditch New Town), Sylvia Crowe (Commonwealth Institute, London and the roof garden for the Scottish Widows building in Edinburgh) and Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe (Atlanta History Center and JFK Memorial at Runnymede). 

LI trustee Penny Beckett, said: "At MERL the Landscape Institute’s archive will not only be conserved but will be accessible to all and in time will realise its true potential.  And, by setting up a friends’ group to support the archive it has an exciting future.

"There will be funding from the Landscape Institute on what we intend will be an annual basis, to ensure that the archive will be actively used and developed for research-led interpretation and study of the work and achievements of landscape professionals."


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