James Hallett to leave British Growers Association

James Hallett is to leave his position as chief executive of the British Growers Association (BGA) at the end of January 2014.

After two years with BGA, Mr Hallett will be taking on a senior role within the UK animal feed sector based closer to his family home in Shropshire.

British Growers’ chairman Mark Leggott said: "James Hallett leaves with our best wishes for the future. Working closely with the head office team at Louth, he has made a significant contribution to strengthening the services BGA provides to UK growers, not only through our established network of Producer Organisations and Crop Associations, but also in raising the profile of our organisation and the horticulture industry as a whole.

"As a result, British Growers’ members now enjoy more effective links with Government, media, the research community and other industry organisations.

Leggott added: "This is certainly an exciting time for our sector. The security, sustainability and affordability of food supplies are high on the political agenda, and the UK’s Agri-Tech Strategy demonstrates increased support for science and innovation in providing solutions.

"At the same time, renewed recognition of the food chain as a strategically important part of the UK economy opens up major opportunities within the UK’s £3.7bn fresh produce sector to increase home-grown production, displace imports and boost economic activity.

"Working on members’ behalf, the British Growers Association has a key role to play in helping to unlock those opportunities, and BGA will shortly be announcing new management arrangements to take the organisation into a new phase of enterprise and leadership for the UK horticulture sector."


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