Ideal weather prompts gardeners to forecast good year for snowdrops

Professional gardeners are predicting a good year for snowdrops, with many already in flower and cold weather on the way likely to prolong the season.

Snowdrops bring in the visitors to public gardens - image: HW
Snowdrops bring in the visitors to public gardens - image: HW

Many said the mild winter had resulted in early flowers and a shift to colder weather was likely to keep them in flower for longer.

Painswick Rococo Garden garden adviser Paul Harvey Brooks said the flowers were bringing in visitors early and it was likely that snowdrop events scheduled throughout February could go ahead as planned.

"Snowdrops tend to be quite well behaved and if it's cold and bright they go into a dormant phase and stay in flower," he added. "The ideal season is one where they flower early and then it gets colder. They should last through February and touch the beginning of March."

Attingham Park senior park and estate warden Colin Morris said: "We had record visitors last weekend because of that first snowdrop sighting. If it gets colder it probably won't be a problem because it will just hold them back and prolong the season."

But colder parts of the country could have problems with colder weather on the way. Chirk Castle head gardener David Lock said: "The snowdrops are just beginning to flower here. But if it stays cold the woodland areas where they're clustered will be late."


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