Homebase withdraws neonicoinoids

Homebase has become the latest retailer to take action on neonicotinoid chemicals linked to bee decline.

In a statement sent to Friends of the Earth the store said: "As a precautionary measure Homebase have removed from sale the Bayer Lawn Grub Killer which contains imidacloprid."

The withdrawal follows similar moves by B&Q and Wickes.

Friends of the Earth head of campaigns Andrew Pendleton said: "It’s fantastic news that major retailers are removing pesticides linked to bee decline from their shelves.

"It’s time for the Government to act responsibly too – Ministers must suspend from sale the three neonicotinoids named by European food safety experts earlier this month.

"David Cameron must also introduce a National Bee Action Plan to protect these key pollinators."

Homebase added: Homebase is aware of the current interest in the possible effect of neonicotinoids on the population of honeybees, bumble bees and other pollinating insects.

"All pesticides stocked by Homebase fully comply with EU legislation.

"Neonicotinoids are not present in any Homebase branded insecticide. As a precautionary measure Homebase have removed from sale the Bayer Lawn Grub Killer which contains imidacloprid.

"We will continue to be guided by Defra and will take any responsible action with regard to range as directed."

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