High residues found on three potato samples

Three samples of UK-grown potatoes were among produce found to contain more than permitted maximum residue levels (MRLs) during the second quarter of 2012.

A report from Defra's expert committee on pesticide residues in food found that two samples contained the sprout suppressant chlorpropham and one the nematicide fosthiazate. They were among 12 from the 845 samples taken from 26 different foods found to exceed MRLs. All the others were from imported crops.

The committee commented: "Some individuals might experience transient effects on health such as salivation, lethargy and gastrointestinal disturbance after consuming a large amount of potatoes with the highest levels of fosthiazate found in this survey."

The exceedance of chlorpropham was unlikely to have any effect on health, the committee added.


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