Greenvale's vegetable-cleaning system meets 75% water-saving target in three months

Greenvale has released performance figures for its new vegetable-cleaning system, Project Cascade.

The system, which has been running for three months at the company's Tern Hill site in Shropshire, has not only achieved its original targets but in almost every area smashed through them, Greenvale claimed. 

The water-saving target of just over 75% has already been met. However, Greenvale's trial runs suggest savings of 85% are easily achievable. 

The site washes 140,000 tonnes of fresh potatoes per year and the standard system used around 82 million litres of water. 

An 85% reduction equates to a saving of almost 70 million litres a year. 

Cascade has also cut the energy cost of chilling by 55%. 

"The results are way beyond exceptions," said Andy Clarkson, general manager of Greenvale at Tern Hill. 

"Cascade is designed to clean potatoes but could be applied to any root vegetables. It is a truly environmental solution. Applied across the industry it will save the UK millions of pounds and billions of litres of water, every year. 

Greenvale plans to officially launch the system in 2010, once all trials have been completed. 

For more information visit  www.greenvale.co.uk

 

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