Our gardeners are happy says National Trust after union calls for Living Wage for all

The National Trust has responded to the Prospect trade union's call for higher pay saying that it pays most of its employees the Living Wage and staff are generally happy.

The gardens at Sissinghurst Castle are run by National Trust workers
The gardens at Sissinghurst Castle are run by National Trust workers

Responding to today's call for all National Trust workers to be paid at least the Living Wage, a trust spokeswoman said that 83 per cent of regular employees were paid the Living Wage, which is £7.85 an hour and £9.15 an hour inside London.

"We’re committed to offering all our staff a fair and competitive level of pay. Over the last few years we have invested the biggest proportion of our annual pay awards into the basic pay of our staff, particularly our lowest paid grades.

"Eight three per cent of our regular employees are already paid above the new Living Wage rate and we will continue to monitor the situation to ensure our pay rates remain fair and competitive. 

"As a charity, we value all our staff and each year we ask them how they feel about working for the National Trust (NT), across a wide range of topics including pay and 94 per cent tell us they are satisfied with their working conditions. But we recognise we can always do more, and we will continue to work closely with our employees to look at how we could improve further."

Prospect, which represents professional gardeners who work for the NT, says that low pay within the organisation has left many employees struggling below the poverty line.



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