Fruit nursery renews African tree-planting partnership

Blackmoor Nurseries in Hampshire has renewed its partnership with the charity TREE AID through 2012.

The fruit nursery donated £9,526 to the charity's Tree Revolution Campaign in 2011, which allowed 9,526 fruit trees to be planted in Africa's Sahel region.

Each of its customers is asked to make a donation, which is added to by the nursery. The trees create a safety net when food becomes scarce and the produce can be sold by the villagers to earn a little money for their families.

Blackmoor became partner to the charity in December 2010 and customers were invited to donate as part of its online shopping process.

Nursery manager Jon Munday said: "As customers enjoy the bounty from their own fruit trees and bushes at home, they will have the opportunity to help some of the most vulnerable families on the planet to do the same."

He added: " I am delighted to say that for every donation made by a customer we will continue to donate 10 per cent of the value of the basket too - equivalent to the cost of another 10,000 trees.

"The trees will support TREE AID's vision to see poverty replaced by thriving, selfreliant communities across the African drylands."


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