Fourth Thanet Earth glasshouse is up and running

A fourth glasshouse at Kent's Thanet Earth protected horticulture complex is expected to yield tomatoes in time for Easter.

tomato growing - image: Tim Lewis
tomato growing - image: Tim Lewis
The 8-hectare glasshouse, its combined heat and power unit, and link to the site's electrical substation, together cost £17 million to construct.

It is owned jointly by Thanet Earth's project partners Fresca Group, Rainbow UK, A&A Growers and Kaaij UK, and will be managed by Kaaij's Gert van Straalen. It will employ up to 100 staff.

A statement from the group said: "[Thanet Earth] has made great progress financially, moving from large losses in year one towards a modest profit in year three. The future’s looking even brighter now."

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Sign up now
Already registered?
Sign in

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus

Read These Next

What does the 25-year plan mean for growers?

What does the 25-year plan mean for growers?

Published on 11 January, the Government's long-awaited 'A Green Future: Our 25 Year Plan to Improve the Environment' brings together a number of policy strands into a single framework that will impact many sectors, not least fresh produce, over the coming decades.

What will 'embracing change' mean for horticulture?

What will 'embracing change' mean for horticulture?

At the Oxford Farming Conference, whose theme was "embracing change", Defra secretary Michael Gove expanded on what a post-Brexit UK agriculture and land-use policy will look like and how it will impact farmers and growers.

Can growers see off the looming labour crisis by boosting efficiency?

Can growers see off the looming labour crisis by boosting efficiency?

Concern over the availability of seasonal labour to the fresh-produce industry has never been greater.