Food bloggers sent free apple samples

Sainsbury's is promoting its Lord Derby cooking apples by sending samples to food bloggers on request, along with its own-brand cinnamon and nutmeg, for them to try out and report on its Lord Derby crumble recipe.

The British-grown cookers, which date from Victorian times, have firmer flesh than the larger and more familiar Bramley's. Preferring cooler weather, it the variety was originally grown commercially in Cheshire.

Lancashire blogger Red Rose Mummy wrote: "You could definitely taste a difference between the Lord Derby apples and Bramley's. The apples tasted a little sharper and also held their form better. Usually I find that Bramley apples cook down into a mush, but these didn't. We really enjoyed the apples and our crumble - it was the perfect accompaniment to Bonfire Night."


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