EU fees threaten pesticide use

Higher fees for EU pesticide regulations could result in fewer applications and products for sale.

Changes to the fee structure for regulations could mean fewer products on retailers' shelves - image: HW
Changes to the fee structure for regulations could mean fewer products on retailers' shelves - image: HW

Plans to raise the fees for pesticide registrations could result in fewer applications and reduce the number of products available.

UK legislation to set fees for implementing EU pesticide regulations EC 1107/2009 came into force at the end of September and Defra has published a summary of responses to the consultation held earlier this year.

The Government said that after the consultation it had maintained its approach to enforcement and fees, with some amendments.

The EU regulations have changed the criteria by which pesticide ingredients are approved, prompting fears that a number of active ingredients could be lost.

Expert view on the impact of higher pesticide fees for growers

John Adlam, managing director, Dove Associates

"The costs could be quite high for growers. Fees for extensions of use are due to go up to as much as £1,700 for a single application. This is quite a high cost for getting approval.

"This has long-term implications. Price increases will create a reluctance to submit products and reduce availability. You can keep using the same products, but using fewer options puts pressure on resistance."

He added that there are concerns that the UK legislation will be implemented without attention to detail or investigation. "In Holland there is a lot of water around the nurseries and in the UK that's not the case. There should be some degree of attention paid to these differences and we're not seeing a lot of that. They seem to be taking it as written in the EU regulations."


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