Eden Project wins grant to promote careers in horticulture

The Eden Project in Cornwall has won a grant of almost £95,000 to develop a programme which encourages young people to consider careers in horticulture.

The Eden Project wants to encourage the next generation of horticulturists. Image: Hufton+Crow
The Eden Project wants to encourage the next generation of horticulturists. Image: Hufton+Crow

The grant, from education charity the Edge Foundation, will fund Eden’s Horticulture Advocates Programme (HAP) which promotes STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Maths) careers in horticulture.

The HAP will train 14 year olds from five local secondary schools to become Horticulture Advocates. They will spend one day a month working with horticulture apprentices, HE students, employers and academics. In the second year, they will become mentors to the next cohort.

Head of Eden Project Learning, professor Robert Barratt, said: "One of the key aims of HAP is to improve the reputation of horticulture as a real and aspirational career option for young people.

"Plant life is fundamental to our existence on the planet and STEAM subjects are key to ensuring future sustainability. Students will see how science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics are relevant to roles in the industry from botany to greenhouse design or landscaping to data analysis."   

Edge chief executive, Alice Barnard, said: "This initiative is a resourceful approach to tackling the skills gap in the horticulture sector. It also offers great opportunities to students to see the relevance of learning to the world of work, gain an insight into the industry and be better able to make informed choices about their futures."

A survey of 200 horticultural businesses in 2013 found that 72% were unable to fill skilled vacancies


Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Sign up now
Already registered?
Sign in

Read These Next

Interracial love in 18th-Century Wales - John Ystumllyn, gardener and first recorded black person in North Wales, and Margaret Gruffydd, maid

Interracial love in 18th-Century Wales - John Ystumllyn, gardener and first recorded black person in North Wales, and Margaret Gruffydd, maid

Urban Green Newcastle - Looking to a greener future for our towns and cities

Urban Green Newcastle - Looking to a greener future for our towns and cities

The coronavirus pandemic has caused us all to rethink how we carry out our day-to-day lives; from how we move around, how we work, and the places we visit. It’s also reminded us about the things most important to us too.

Life after lockdown

Life after lockdown

Landscape consultant and former Bracknell Forest Council parks head Helen Tranter writes on park life after coronavirus lockdown eases.


Follow us on:
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • Google +

HW Podcast

Horticulture Week Podcast #2: Peter Seabrook and Matt Appleby

Horticulture Week Podcast #2: Peter Seabrook and Matt Appleby

Peter Seabrook has spent his lockdown rebuilding The Sun's Floral Fantasia display at RHS Hyde Hall. He says garden designers and local authorities should take note that the popular colourful bedding displays have attracted record numbers of visitors to the garden.

 

Horticulture Week

The latest developments concerning coronavirus for horticulture industry professionals involved in buying or selling garden products and plants or producing and participating in horticultural shows and events.
Horticulture Jobs
More Horticulture Jobs

HORTICULTURE WEEK Custodian Awards

Find out more about the outstanding parks, gardens and arboricultural projects and teams that became our Custodian Award 2019 winners.

Products & Kit Resources