Career profile - Garden Designer

A garden designer sketches out a vision of form, function and beauty for an otherwise lacklustre plot of land. Such designs usually incorporate hard landscaping, such as paths and walls, as well as soft landscaping, such as shrubs and flower beds, that together create a space that delights and inspires.

What is best about being a garden designer?

"It’s about the variety, as long as you are willing to be adventurous," says Claire Belderbos, sales and marketing director of garden design and landscaping specialist Belderbos Landscapes. "The better the reputation you have, the more exposure you get to different types of projects. We’ve been in business for 14 years and every week you get exposed to some really interesting ideas." Paul Cowell, owner of garden design and construction firm PC Landscapes, agrees. "It’s the variety of projects that you get to work on, clients you get to meet and situations and locations," he says.

What skills, attributes, knowledge and experience are most in demand for this role in the recruitment market at the moment — and why?

A creative edge

"The industry wants garden designers to push the boundaries," notes Belderbos. "People hate going to the RHS Chelsea Flower Show and seeing the same old styles. They want to see designers trying to be different."

A team player

Belderbos points out that creating a new garden is a partnership. "You need people who can work as part of a team. It’s all about collaboration.

Your listening skills also need to be paramount. If what the client wants doesn’t align with you, you have to create a compromise."

A commercial mind

Belderbos says it is difficult for the industry to find designers "who don’t just do it as a pastime", adding: "We are running a business and we are serving people all of the time. You want a garden designer to be acting in the interest of getting a job done."

Practical landscaping knowledge

Cowell notes that having some practical knowledge of how materials are constructed is a key skill. "Effectively you are designing a bespoke garden that’s never been built before, so you need to have that kind of practical know-how," he adds. "Understanding how all the materials go together is vitally important."

Organisational skills

"Once you are running a contract you also need to have good administration and time-management skills," adds Cowell. "The entire contract is run by the integrity of the designer."

What sort of qualifications and experience would you need to see from a candidate to be convinced that they possess these qualities?

From short courses to diplomas to degrees, there are many different garden design qualifications available. Belderbos has employed people who have trained at Capel Manor, which runs a foundation degree (level 4 and 5) in garden design and plantsmanship, and Chelsea-based KLC, whose diploma includes the opportunity to work at Hampton Court Palace. "It’s much healthier to do a broader-based course where you learn a bit of everything," says Belderbos. "So you are looking for people who are passionate about the industry and if they have got some work experience then that’s helpful." Cowell agrees. "There’s nothing better than practical experience," he says. "If they’ve worked with good-quality contractors and seen how these things are put together, it would help their career move forward far more quickly."

Are any of the skills that are in demand transferable from any other horticulture roles?

"Yes," says Cowell. "I’ve met many garden designers who worked in a garden centre or a nursery because they love plants. They’d known that they have graphic skills because they can draw and design. If they have a little construction knowledge they can team up with a good contractor." Belderbos adds: "People often come into garden design later in life as a second career, so yes, many of the skills are transferable."


Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Sign up now
Already registered?
Sign in

Read These Next

Tsuga

Tsuga

From bonsai, rock garden and ground cover to dense hedges and extremely elegant trees up to 50m tall, the small genus of Tsuga may only have 10 species of evergreen conifers but it has variety and versatility.

Vaccinium

Vaccinium

Pretty flowers, shiny leaves and delicious berries make this an appealing choice for garden designers, writes Sally Drury.

What have been some of the highlights from 180 years of Horticulture Week?

What have been some of the highlights from 180 years of Horticulture Week?

For Horticulture Week's 180th anniversary, many former and current contributors have shared memories of their time at the title.


Partner Content

How indoor growers can successfully finance greenhouse innovations

How indoor growers can successfully finance greenhouse innovations

Presented by GE Current, a Daintree company
How to spot and control caterpillar infestation – and save your crop

How to spot and control caterpillar infestation – and save your crop

Presented by Fargro

Horticulture Week Top 70 Landscape and maintenance contractors

See our exclusive RANKING of landscape and maintenance contractors by annual turnover plus BUSINESS TRENDS REPORT AND ANALYSIS

FIND THE LATEST LANDSCAPE TENDERS

Tenders Tracker: LIVE TABLE

Tenders Tracker: LIVE TABLE

Welcome to Tender Watch, where Horticulture Week keeps track of the latest horticulture-related public sector tenders of value £10,000 or over so you don't have to.

Horticulture Jobs
More Horticulture Jobs

BUSINESS LEADS

Build your business with the latest public sector tenders covering landscape, arboriculture, grounds care, turf careproduction and kit supplies. 

PLANT SUPPLIERS GUIDE

Free to subscribers, the essential guide for professional plant buyers
 

Download your copy

Products & Kit Resources