Capel Manor staff and students collaborate on park wildlife garden

Staff and students at Capel Manor College's Crystal Park campus have designed and built a wildlife garden in the park.

Capel Manor staff and students gather at the opening
Capel Manor staff and students gather at the opening

The Crystal Palace Park Community Wildlife Space will provide both a welcoming habitat for wildlife and a place where people living locally can learn about the creatures that live there. Capel staff and students will maintain and develop it in collaboration with the local community.

A programme of community events and family learning activities is also in development. 

The Space has been created on a 100m square piece of land that was inaccessible to the public. Now they can access it through the Farm in Crystal Palace Park.  It was part-funded by Bromley Council's Community Project Fund and led by the college’s business development consultant Maggie Roy.

Staff and students of Capel will maintain and develop the Space on an ongoing basis, improving the features and activities in collaboration with the local community. A programme of community events and family learning activities is also in development. 

Bromley councillors, investors, students and members of the community gathered for the grand unveiling of the community wildlife space last week.

Andy Smith, centre head at Capel’s Crystal Palace Centre said: "One of the best parts of this project is that our Animal Care, Arboriculture and Horticulture tutors and students used their expertise and worked together to make this a huge success.

"Also, thanks to Maggie Roy who lead this project from the initial concept and bidding for funds all the way to the finished design, and to Emily and Kirsti for all their design skills." 


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