Biogas plant boosts Fenmarc self-sufficiency

Vegetable grower and packer Fenmarc's site in March, Cambridgeshire, is set to become self-sufficient in renewable energy as it steps up generation from its new anaerobic digestion plant next door.

The £6m 17m-high facility, owned and operated by Local Generation, a sister company to Fenmarc, opened at the end of last year and it is already generating more than 50 per cent of the site's total electricity requirement. The plant benefited from a £1.4m grant from the Government's Waste & Resources Action Programme (WRAP).

The process uses micro- organisms to digest the waste and so release biogas, chiefly methane and carbon dioxide. This is then processed through a series of combined heat and power units to produce electricity and heat. Any surplus will be transferred to the National Grid.

The company claimed that, when working at capacity, the plant will consume up to 30,000 tonnes of food waste a year generated by nearby retailers and food manufacturers that would otherwise have gone to landfill sites.

According to the firm's agricultural director Mark Taylor: "It is important we continue to drive a sustainable business that allows for growth and the partnership with the anaerobic digestion plant is a key part of driving that forward."


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