BackRow mix tackles annual meadow grass

Mixing the specialist soil adjuvant BackRow with widely-used pre-emergence herbicides helps enhance weed control, allowing potato crops to emerge quicker, independent trials have shown.

Alan East, technical manager for Interagro, said the trials have demonstrated the positive effects of BackRow with herbicides such as Afalon (linuron), Artist (flufenacet and metribuzin), Defy (prosulfocarb), Sencorex (metribuzin), Stomp Aqua or Cinder (pendimethalin).

"The alternative contact treatments are weaker on annual meadow grass, so more reliance is being put on the remaining residuals for the control of this damaging weed," said East. "BackRow has raised the level of control of this weed in all its residual mixes, giving them that vital extra push they need."

He added: "Another problem that growers have had is the new lower maximum dose rate for linuron of just 600 gms.ai/ha (equivalent to 1.35 litre/ha for a 450 gm/litre formulation). At this rate linuron has become a mixer product and its performance needs to be maximised."

"A series of replicated trials show that the addition of BackRow to 0.5 litre/ha of linuron increased the level of annual meadow grass control from 87 per cent to 94 per cent, the level of Fat-hen control from 88 per cent to 94 per cent, Groundsel from 83 per cent to 92 per cent, Mayweed from 80 per cent to 83 per cent and Pale Persicaria from 75 per cent to 83 per cent."

ADDITIVE EFFECTIVENESS - WEED CONTROL RESULTS

When BackRow was added to 4 litres/ha of Defy, the control of annual meadow grass was lifted from 91 per cent to 95 per cent, for Fat-hen control from 95 per cent to 99 per cent, Groundsel from 92 per cent to 95 per cent, Mayweed from 89 per cent to 93 per cent and Pale Persicaria from 79 per cent to 84 per cent.

Similar additive results were seen for Artist (metribuzin and flufenacet), Sencorex (metribuzin) and for mixes of Artist plus Defy and linuron plus Defy in potatoes.

BackRow is recommended at a dose rate of 400ml/ha, irrespective of water volumes and is particularly effective at low-water volumes.


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