B&Q and T&M pull Busy Lizzies over downy mildew fears

B&Q will not sell Impatiens walleriana this year because of the increased risk of downy mildew in the plant.

B&Q is withdrawing Busy Lizzies from its shelves - image: HW
B&Q is withdrawing Busy Lizzies from its shelves - image: HW
B&Q usually sells 20 million Busy Lizzies a year. It plans to stock more geraniums, begonias, petunias and marigolds.

Horticulture buyer Joclyn Silezin told Amateur Gardening:

"With the future of Busy Lizzies under threat, we’ve had to take drastic measures to find replacements for the nation’s favourite plant."

Thompson & Morgan (T&M) has also withdrawn Impatiens walleriana despite selling 9.2million in 2011, generating £1million.

T&M is urging gardeners to switch to begonias and New Guinea impatiens.

 

See our Downy Mildew Pest & Disease Factsheet


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