Me & My Job - Sylvia Cooper, office/operations manager, Floramedia

Sylvia Cooper, office/operations manager, Floramedia - image: Floramedia
Sylvia Cooper, office/operations manager, Floramedia - image: Floramedia

- How did you get started in the industry? I have always had a love of plants but it was actually by chance that I found myself in the horticulture industry when I applied for a temporary position within Floramedia. This turned into a permanent role and then as the company grew I moved upwards within it.

A few years ago I was promoted to my current position and became part of the Floramedia management team.

- What does your typical day involve? Each day is different. Mostly though my main role is to manage the projects and customer service teams to ensure we meet and deliver on customers' expectations.

- What takes up most of your time? I suppose it has to be running and analysing reports - in theory they shouldn't take up much of my time, but inevitably they do.

- What is the best aspect of your job? I think this has to be the satisfaction of seeing a project evolve from an initial idea to a printed product and knowing that I have been instrumental in its execution.

- And the worst? Travelling on the M25.

- What is your greatest achievement at work? There is not one in particular but I love a challenge and delivering on a promise. Customer satisfaction is key and if I can achieve that then I'm happy.

- How do you wind down after a hard day at work? I live by the coast so I love getting out on the water whenever I can or taking a walk along the beach.

- What does the future hold? The future is very exciting, especially with the mobile and web-based side of the business for horticultural retail, and this is something I really look forward to seeing evolve during the next couple of years.


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