Me & My Job - Richard Gill, Sales Development Manager, Green-tech

Richard Gill, Sales Development Manager, Green-tech - image: Green-tech

How did you get started in the industry? I lived in Canada working with horses for two years when I left school and came back to the UK and needed a job. My mother had seen the job advert in the local paper. Next thing I knew I was a junior sales adviser for Green-tech and here I am 13 years later.

What advice would you give to others starting out? Work hard and you’ll get the rewards. Face a problem, never ignore or it will just become worse. Always remember we’re in an fantastic industry with fantastic people — we’re all down-to-earth people.

What does your typical day involve? Keeping customers happy. It could be anything, which is what I love about this industry. I could be quoting for a new job, fighting to secure an order, out at an event or visiting a customer. I also have a great team of five sales advisers.

What is the best aspect of your job? Customer satisfaction. There’s nothing better than the job satisfaction when we’re dealing with a tricky customer or site and they’re impressed by our top-class service. I work hard to build up great relationships with my customers.

And the worst? Seeing things go wrong. But like I said, face the problem head-on and get it sorted quickly.

What have you been working on recently? I’ve been made BALI chairman for the Yorkshire/North East region. This will be a challenge over the year.

What has been your biggest achievement at work? I was the first sales adviser to achieve £1m worth of turnover for Green-tech.

What does the future hold for the industry? There’s only one way to look at the future of this incredible industry and it’s with an open mind and a positive attitude.

How do you unwind after a hard day at work? I go home and chill with my soon-to-be wife. In the summer we have a small group at Green-tech who like to get a round of golf in after work.


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