Me & My Job - John Hughes, senior technical adviser, DLF Trifloium

John Hughes, senior technical adviser, DLF Trifloium - image: DLFT
John Hughes, senior technical adviser, DLF Trifloium - image: DLFT

- How did you get started in the industry?

My first job was at the Welsh Plant Breeding Station in Aberystwyth, where I worked in the chemistry and agronomy departments. After I gained a BSc (Hons) in applied biology, I spent some time lecturing and teaching. I then worked for Germinal in the amenity seed sector for 10 years and moved to the Cebeco seeds group. Cebeco became part of the DLF Trifolium group shortly after.

- What advice would you give to others starting out?

Try to work in an area that really interests you and find a reputable company so that you can truly recommend and support its products.

- What does your typical day involve?

There isn't a typical day. I may be discussing the best options for turf production and then following the progress of the seed at a stadium within the same day. Most of my time is spent on the road visiting customers in the local authority, turf and sport sectors. I have responsibility for product sales and support in the north of England and Scotland. I also work closely with our distributors providing technical support for seed ranges. I usually spend one day a week on administrative work.

- What is the best aspect of your job?

Working with a varied and dedicated customer base of professionals genuinely trying to provide the best they can. Having the freedom to make my own decisions supported by a great team of people and distributors. Also seeing the results achieved at venues great and small.

- And the worst?

Sitting at a standstill on the M62 staring at the back of a lorry in the pouring rain - usually somewhere near Leeds.

- What is your greatest achievement at work?

Having the trust of our customers as well as a reputation for being professional and honest.


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