WRAP offers 'resource maps' to help firms calculate waste

The Government's recycling watchdog is to help fruit and vegetable firms make an exact science of the woolly job of totting up amounts of food and packaging waste.

"Resource maps" will smooth companies more efficiently through retail and wholesale supply chains, the Waste & Resources Action Programme (WRAP) hopes.

"This research aims to quantify types and amounts of food and packaging waste throughout the supply chain and find out why they occur," said a WRAP representative.

Carbon impact and economic value would be worked out to pinpoint priority areas for cutting waste. WRAP is drawing up a list of firms to work with, and said it would look at best-practice models to promote across the sector.

Food production and consumption accounted for 18 per cent of UK greenhouse gas emissions, and overall food waste was thought to be around 20 million tonnes, WRAP said. This latest move is an extension of a drive to reduce household food waste. Industry workshops were held in London and Leeds in September.

Ideas included improved storage guidance for consumers, more consistent date labelling, a greater range of pack sizes and packaging changes to increase shelf life.

Food categories making the "most significant" contribution to food waste were fresh fruit and vegetables, along with bakery products, fresh meats and fish.

Food waste minimisation manager Andrew Parry said: "Retailers and manufacturers can help reduce the amount of food thrown away in the UK. This would have environmental benefits, drive cost savings for the industry and customers, and enhance loyalty in very difficult financial times."


Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Sign up now
Already registered?
Sign in

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus

Read These Next

How should fruit growers prepare for water abstraction reform?

How should fruit growers prepare for water abstraction reform?

Upcoming reforms to water abstraction licensing will for the first time cap the amount of water that fruit growers can take for trickle irrigation.

Getting a measure of the production labour crisis

Getting a measure of the production labour crisis

At a debate during last week's Fruit Focus trade show in Kent, senior industry figures painted a bleak picture of an increasingly difficult seasonal labour market that is already impacting on investment.

What will post-Brexit pesticides authorisation and capital support for fresh produce look like?

What will post-Brexit pesticides authorisation and capital support for fresh produce look like?

The likely impact on seasonal labour has dominated discussions of the consequences of withdrawal from the EU for UK production horticulture.


Follow us on:
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • Google +
Horticulture Jobs
More Horticulture Jobs

Pest & Disease Tracker bulletin 

The latest pest and disease alerts, how to treat them, plus EAMU updates, sent direct to your inbox.

Sign up here

Professor Geoffrey Dixon

GreenGene International chair Geoff Dixon on the business of fresh produce production
 

Read Professor Geoffrey Dixon