Whirlow Hall shows farms in action to youth

Inner-city children and young people with special needs are helping to grow grapes on what is believed to be the highest and possibly coldest vineyard in the UK.

Whirlow Hall Farm Trust, which gives youngsters the chance to see working farms in action, is managing the vineyard on its land in south-west Sheffield.

The trust is planting more than 3,000 vines on 82 trellised rows on one hectare of land 262m above sea level. The trellis supports Solaris and Rondo grape varieties.

Whirlow Hall Farm volunteer Richard Moore said: "We took technical advice, did a soil analysis and added fertiliser. Despite the vineyard's high location, the site is well sheltered."

Gripple donated posts, tension cables and anchors for the varieties, which are resistant to winter frosts and used across northern Germany for white wine and rose.


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