Whirlow Hall Farm Trust and Gripple plant vineyard 262 metres above sea level

One of the country's highest vineyards has been planted on the site of a Sheffield educational trust.

The 1ha vineyard on the Sheffield farm is 262m above sea level and has been planted as a result of a partnership between the wire joiner Gripple and the Whirlow Hall Farm Trust - an educational trust that provides inner-city children and young people with special needs with the opportunity to see a working farm.

The farm is aiming to have two new English wines, to be known as "Werlot", on the shelves in three years' time.

Richard Moore, a Whirlow Hall Farm volunteer, said: "We have taken a great deal of technical advice and completed a full soil analysis.

We have added fertiliser to balance the soil nutrients and despite the vineyard's high location, the site is well sheltered. We are confident that the vineyard will produce two cheeky little numbers."

Gripple provided the posts and wires needed and 11 employees to help with the planting of more than 3,000 vines and the setting up of 82 rows of trellis to support the growth of Solaris and Rondo grape varieties.

These varieties, resistant to winter frosts and used famously across northern Germany, will produce both white and rose wines.

Gripple Plus devices were employed to join and tension the line wires and Gripple Plus Anchor Kits to secure each end post, resulting in a neat structure.


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