Westland weedkiller claims retail top spot

Westland is claiming sales of almost four million units for its Resolva 24-hour weedkillers this summer, as well as the top spot in UK gardening outlets for the contact and systemic proprietary weedkiller.

The product is expected to feature strongly at Westland's Glee stand after being launched at the Birmingham NEC garden retail show last year.

The company said that Resolva's ready-to-spray and concentrates ranges were top sellers at more than 80 per cent of UK gardening outlets in 2008.

NSD International (formerly Simpson Label Company) printed the Resolva labels.

NSD supplemented some batches of containers with new "peel and read" labels on the reverse of the product because the quantity of text, including appropriate safety instructions and usage requirements, was too great to be accommodated on the smaller, concentrate products.

NSD International also applied special-release lacquers that allow these labels to be opened, read and closed repeatedly.


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