Welsh firm wins partnership award

A Welsh trading group, the country's biggest supplier of leeks and daffodils, has taken the Taste of Wales farming partnership award in recognition of its working relationships with growers in the Vale of Glamorgan and Flintshire.

Really Welsh grows cauliflowers, leeks and daffodils on 607ha of land in the Vale of Glamorgan and Flintshire, supplying the likes of Tesco, Waitrose and Wyevale with fresh produce throughout the year.

The award recognises the partnerships it has established with local farmers to provide a continual supply of produce to market.

Due to the fact that brassicas can only be grown on land one year in five, Really Welsh rents land from surrounding farms. This gives the land owners a break in their rotation, they are paid and the land is returned to them in the condition it was found.

The company has boosted the volume of locally grown leeks in Tesco and Waitrose stores in Wales since it started operating in 2005, bringing the national emblem back to its home soil. It successfully staged a major PR campaign in Welsh supermarkets last month with Welsh Leek Week.

Commercial director Richard Arnold said: "We are extremely proud of what we have achieved in Wales over the past couple of years and of the partnerships that have been built, which have made it possible to offer Welsh customers excellent locally grown produce."

Farm manager Andy Blair added: "Our Really Welsh cauliflowers also got commended by the judges."


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