Veg and potato growers adapting best to climate change, reveals Farming Futures survey

Vegetable and potato growers came out top in a survey measuring how the food production industry is adapting to the impacts of climate change.

The survey by Farming Futures - an industry-led project which helps farmers and growers respond to climate change - revealed that 47% of vegetable and potato growers said they were taking action.

The survey also revealed that one in four farmers and growers have noticed increased interest from customers in their environmental performance over the past year.

Key findings

  • 53% of those surveyed recognise that addressing climate change offers potential business opportunities - a significant rise on last year
  • the number of farmers and growers producing their own energy has doubled.
  • almost half are taking action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from their land (48%)
  • one in three (31%) of farmers and growers are doing something to adapt to the impacts of climate change
  • Almost half (47%) of farmers and growers are confident that the industry's target to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 11% by 2020 can be met
  • 47% are improving energy efficiency on their farm

Madeleine Lewis, Farming Futures strategic advisor, said: "Like every sector of the economy, farming has its role to play in the shift to a low carbon economy, but the good news is that a lot of the things farmers can do are good for their bottom line too. And it's not all about big investments - as we can see from the survey results, almost half of farmers are improving the energy efficiency on their farm - these smaller actions are just as important."

The release of the survey findings coincides with the launch last week of Farming Futures' new website and blog: www.farmingfutures.org.uk.

The website will also list Farming Future's series of free on-farm events across England which begin in the summer.

 


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