UK coir supplier partners in Hungarian grower training centre

UK-based growing media supplier Cocogreen, together with a local partner, has opened a research and training centre to help east-central European growers increase output of paprika and other hydroponically grown crops.

Cocogreen's Thomas Ogden and Dr Sudesh Fernando at the opening - image: Cocogreen
Cocogreen's Thomas Ogden and Dr Sudesh Fernando at the opening - image: Cocogreen

The centre is located in Szentes, south-east Hungary, in the country's paprika (pepper) and tomato growing region. Other crops grown at the centre include strawberries, raspberries, aubergine, Gerbera, roses and turf.

It consists of six polytunnels and greenhouses featuring hanging gutter systems, Priva climate controls and automated fertilization and irrigation units. All crops are grown in Cocogreen coir substrates.

Hungarian paprika and tomato crops have traditionally been grown in the soil, in unheated polytunnels or in open fields, but the region is currently seeing rapid transition to hydroponics growing systems.

Cocogreen commercial director Thomas Ogden said: "At this new trials centre growers from Eastern and Central Europe can see at first hand the major improvements that can be achieved in comparison with existing systems."

Attila Ruszthi of local partner, paprika breeder grower and distributor Duna–R said: "Growers can visit these trials and assess the results using local varieties. We are organizing training and dedicated trials to meet their needs and to optimize our products according to their cropping strategies."

Over 300 people attended the official opening, including leading growers, researchers and members of the Hungarian Parliament. The event was broadcast on Hungarian TV.

The centre will also serve as a distribution point for Cocogreen products.


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