Thompson & Morgan outbids rivals to buy one seed from the world's heaviest pumpkin

Thompson & Morgan is searching for a growing partner for giant fruit and vegetables after making a record-breaking bid for one seed from the world's heaviest pumpkin.

The seed business took part in a live auction of pumpkin seed varieties last Saturday, held by European Giant Vegetable Growers Association. Some 23 lots were included in the online sale.

Thompson & Morgan was one of almost 70 bidders that logged on to wage a four-hour bidding war. The final lot, number 23, was seed from a record-breaking hybrid pumpkin grown by Ron Wallace of Rhode Island, which weighed in at 2,009lbs.

"Wallace’s was the first ever pumpkin to weigh more than 2,000lbs," said Thompson & Morgan. "After a frenzied bidding war, a single seed from Ron’s prize winner was sold to our company for €200."

Managing director Paul Hansord said: "Giant pumpkin seed usually sells for around 46p, so this seems extortionate. But we’re paying for pedigree. If you want a really huge pumpkin you need record-breaking, genetically proven, premium seed."

Auctions of pumpkin seed have been running for over 15 years and the highest price paid for a single pumpkin seed was in 2011 from a 1,810lbs monster. The price, $1,600, was so high because the fruit produced only five seeds.

"We are now searching for a growing partner with specialist knowledge of growing giant vegetables to help raise this precious seed in an attempt to break the record for the world’s heaviest pumpkin."


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