Swindon beekeeper Ron Hoskins breeds varroa-proof bees

Beekeeper Ron Hoskins has developed a strain of bees which can protect themselves from the varroa parasite.


The bees groom each other, removing the varroa mite which carries eight different viruses and is suspected to be one of the causes of the worldwide bee population decline.

Ron Hoskins, President of Swindon & District BKA, spent 18 years developing the bees after suffering tens of thousands of bees to the varroa mite in 1992.

He is now artificially inseminating queens from other hives with sperm from the 'indestructible' bees to allow the new breed to spread through Britain.

The British Beekeepers’ Association described his work as "exciting".

A survey released in May 2010 by the British Beekeepers' Association found that beekeepers lost 17% of their colonies in the last year.

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