Sisis Variseeder

It's yellow, it's Sisis, of course, and it's a familiar story. This machine shows Sisis' obsession with detail, especially in construction. It's tough and strong, but this machine also has bags of talent when it comes to providing a good start to seed germination and establishment.

At the heart of the Variseeder is a studded roller. Specially cast and spiralled to Sisis’ design, the roller creates thousands of round indentations in the soil. Run over the ground two or three times without seed in the hopper, and the result is thousands of tiny “plant pots” pressed into the soil and just waiting to receive seed in a final pass. But equally, a first-class job can be achieved in a single pass.
The studs produce a random pattern of holes, so the ultimate effect is one of broadcasting — but it is broadcasting with a considerable element of accuracy. The Variseeder can be supplied with a choice of seed rollers. It is the seed roller, driven by the rotating studded roller, that delivers the seed to the surface where the holes have been made.
There is a standard roller for sowing heavy rates from 5.76g/m2 up to 17g/m2 and intended for large seeds such as ryegrass. The fine roller will seed with bent/fescue mixtures or straight fescues and covers the same rates from 5.76g/m2 to 17g/m2 depending on gearing. Then there’s the ultra fine roller specifically for sowing pure bents — the seed that’s no bigger than pepper dust. Have you seen the price of bents recently? When it costs £200 or £300 for a bag of seed, you have to use it wisely and carefully. So, this could be the machine for you — it will seed at a rate of just 4g/m2. Even the birds shouldn’t be able to spot it.
If you are a greenkeeper looking to improve greens or overseed tees and approaches, the fine and/or ultra fine roller(s) may be enough. For contractors working on fine turf, tennis courts, cricket squares and pitches, the choice of three rollers gives you all the flexibility you need. And it’s easy to change from one rate or one seed mixture to another — it’s just a matter of two bolts to remove the access plate on the side.
One tester is impressed with the evenness of spread, while another notices how the seed is delivered close to the surface, with a large proportion falling into the shelter of the “plant pots”. “There should be very little drift,” he says. A little topdressing and the job is done.
Hitching the machine is simple and there is no need for a pto. Simply stick it on the three-point linkage of a tractor — anything from 14hp will do — or a Sisis 321 or most other turf vehicles including Toros and Cushmans. Weights can then be added for extra effect in hard conditions.
The machine is easy to use. The hopper is the right height for loading and there is a canvas cover to keep the seed safe, clean and dry and to prevent dust.

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