Sisis Supa-Turfman MK 2

William Hargreaves founded Sisis Equipment more than 70 years ago, in the middle of the biggest depression this country has ever seen. And the fact that the Sisis Supa-Turfman drum-type aerator is still going after 40 years says something about the success of this company's products.

Although we are now offered the mark two version, in principle the Supa-Turfman remains the same. It’s just got better. Whereas the original was only three tines wide, mark two is four tines wide and the drive is faster. We find the machine performs well at a good walking pace.
Supa-Turfman is wheeled to the work site on transport wheels held into place by simple-to-remove R-clips. The machine has recoil starting, and drive from the five-horsepower engine is through a belt and chain to the drum. There is nothing complicated about the Supa-Turfman MK 2. Yet it does an excellent job. The pivoted tine bar gives vertical penetration and withdrawal of the tines without disturbing the surface.
The simplicity of this machine keeps the price down — a point our testers like. Yes, hydraulics are nice when it comes to lifting and lowering tines into the ground, and a reverse gear is handy, but they can put up the cost. We find this machine is very operable without them, though there is a knack or two you should know about. The secret lies in the handles.
When we first try to use the Supa-Turfman, everything goes well until we come to the turn. That’s when our tester finds the handlebar under his chin and he is standing on tiptoe to operate the machine. The answer is to quickly alter the height before heading into the turn: just grab the bar, relocate it into higher holes, do the turn and drop the bar into lower holes as you start the next run. It’s not complicated and it doesn’t hold you up. Two practices and all our testers have mastered the technique.
“The handle height adjustment is excellent. It’s so easy; you don’t have to think or look at what you are doing. And it really does help with the turns,” says one tester.
The Supa-Turfman is of typical Sisis build. It’s robust and all cables are held securely, so they shouldn’t be damaged as the machine is moved about the shed. The range of interchangeable tines available — solid, pencil, hollow coring, jumbo hollow and flat chisel – means that you should always be able to do the work necessary on bowling greens, cricket squares, tennis courts or lawns.

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