Sisis Autocore

It's good to see choices. And this machine has as many choices as you are likely to need. It's versatile. And it's quite fast — a bowling green should be completed in about an hour-and-a-half.

The Autocore is a vertical action aerator. It’s got double-belt drive to a chain and chain drive into the crankshaft. And because it is so strong, we reckon it will work a treat on cricket squares, as well as bowling and golf greens, tees, tennis courts and lawns. There is lots of power.
The handle arrangement is the same as on the Supa-Turfman. Depth is set down to 10cm by locking the mechanism with a bolt. The unit is manual lift and lower; a height lever drops the tines into the ground. A second lever takes it out of drive. The machine pulls backwards in neutral.
Being on three wheels, it is easy to turn and the wheels can manoeuvre to follow contours. The finish is impressive.
“It’s a bit of a beast: there’s plenty of power. This makes it a bit noisy and the going is quite hard on the hands. But the finish is so neat,” says one tester.
The vertical action gives very clean penetration and withdrawal of the tines. It’s effective and leaves a perfect hole. Turf retainers are fitted as standard.
There is no hydraulic lift or reverse, so this machine should be affordable by bowling clubs and small sports clubs, as well as being a sound investment for contractors.
There’s the choice of tine patterns: 93mm centres or 46mm centres. Then there’s the choice of tines. There are solid tines for general use in firm, dry conditions. Fine turf pencil tines will come into their own in summer, while the chisel tine will give a high-wall slit in winter conditions. For compaction relief and soil exchange, there are hollow coring and 10mm diameter hollow tines. There’s a jumbo hollow tine for soil exchange and thatch “plug” removal.
To give a closer hole pattern there are three heads, each with eight tines. The MultiTine head (25mm deep) and MicroCore (50mm deep) are for surface aeration to combat dry patch, but are suitable for seedbed preparation. A needle version should be ideal for dry conditions. What more could you need?

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