Seed bed treatment reduces internal defects and produces more plant stems

Early results of trials carried out this year on potato crops in Norfolk have shown how applying Nemathorin and Amistar treatments can increase yields and improve tuber quality.

The first results from a new series of trials by Syngenta and JP Agronomy, revealed at British Potato 2009 in Harrogate last week, showed that growers could increase yields and improve fry colour and processing quality by using the seed bed combination of Amistar and Nemathorin.

The 2009 trials have also revealed that internal defects in tubers were reduced by more than 12 per cent in untreated plots to just five per cent with Amistar alone and less than four per cent with Nemathorin.

Syngenta potato manager Tom Whitworth said: "In plots where the Nemathorin and Amistar treatments were combined, the internal defects were completely eliminated. The level of tuber damage in the untreated crop would have seen the sample rejected for premium processing markets."

The 2009 trial revealed internal defects in tubers were reduced from over 12 per cent in untreated plots to just five per cent with Amistar alone and less than four per cent with Nemathorin.

"In plots where the treatments were combined, the internal defects were completely eliminated," added Whitworth.

The trials have also shown the Nemathorin and Amistar treatments help crops establish more quickly and maintain ground cover for longer.

In a crop of Hermes, for example, the treated plots achieved 90 per cent ground cover a week ahead of untreated plots and retained more than 55 per cent ground cover at the end of August, when untreated plots had rapidly fallen away to 40 per cent cover.

When tested across a range of varieties, the treatments consistently produced more stems per plant.


Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Sign up now
Already registered?
Sign in

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus

Read These Next

How will reduced apple and pear harvests hit the industry?

How will reduced apple and pear harvests hit the industry?

This spring, many top-fruit growers in the UK and across Europe were dismayed to discover that swathes of their orchards had been hit by frost.

How should fruit growers prepare for water abstraction reform?

How should fruit growers prepare for water abstraction reform?

Upcoming reforms to water abstraction licensing will for the first time cap the amount of water that fruit growers can take for trickle irrigation.

Getting a measure of the production labour crisis

Getting a measure of the production labour crisis

At a debate during last week's Fruit Focus trade show in Kent, senior industry figures painted a bleak picture of an increasingly difficult seasonal labour market that is already impacting on investment.