Scientists prove Tenderstem health benefits

The superior nutritional attributes and tenderness of Tenderstem broccoli have been proven in new research by scientists at Warwick HRI.

The popular variety was shown to contain the highest levels of beneficial glucosinolates - the potent chemicals understood to have cancer-fighting properties - compared to the ten other Brassica varieties tested in the research.

Five other broccoli varieties - including Bellaverde and purple sprouting broccoli - were tested as were three cauliflower and two cabbage varieties.

Tenderstem had approximately 110 micromoles of glucosinolates per 100g - more than ten times the amount found in some of the other Brassica whose scores ranged from approximately 10 to 35 micromoles/100g.

The tests also showed that Tenderstem was the most tender form of broccoli. It outperformed the other long-stemmed and traditional varieties - being between 25 and 30 per cent more tender than purple sprouting broccoli, for example. This means that it requires the least amount of preparation and cooking - making it the best option for retaining a higher proportion of nutrients when consumed.

Guy Barker, the research leader at Warwick University's HRI, said: "The most significant factor in this research is that Tenderstem broccoli is extremely nutrient rich and so tender that it needs very little preparation and can be eaten raw or very lightly cooked, so requiring less cooking than any other form of broccoli and therefore preserving the most essential health-providing nutrients."

Tenderstem broccoli was also highlighted in the research as having high levels of vitamin C, carotenoids and folic acid.

It had a higher concentration of vitamin C than regular types of broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage and, in this study, no other type of broccoli demonstrated higher levels of carotenoids, which are thought to help both fight cancer and reduce the risk of heart disease.

Tenderstem broccoli licencees have been briefed on the research and will work with their respective retailer partners to identify how best to highlight this valuable information to inform and educate consumers about the benefits of the variety in the future.

Andy Macdonald, managing director of Coregeo - the master licensor for Tenderstem in the UK, said: "This powerful piece of research confirms the already strong credentials of Tenderstem broccoli and we look forward to working with our licensees and retailers to maximise this far-reaching study to educate and excite the consumer about the health and taste benefits of eating Tenderstem broccoli".

The research is also being communicated through a PR campaign led by Pam Lloyd PR targeting national, regional and specialist consumer media.

- To view the test results, visit www.tenderstem.co.uk


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