School growing project studied

London schools taking part in the RHS Campaign for School Gardening are to be the subject of a National Institute of Health Research-funded project to see whether gardening at school helps children develop a taste for fruit and vegetables.

The project, led by University of Leeds professor of nutritional epidemiology and public health Janet Cade, will evaluate the RHS campaign at schools in London over two growing seasons.

Baseline food and nutrient intakes in the children will be measured prior to involvement in the scheme and again after two years, she told last week's joint Stockbridge Technology Conference/Horticultural Development Company conference on selling the health message of fruit and vegetables.

The campaign provides resources to help teachers set up and make the most of their school garden, teach the national curriculum outdoors and inspire their pupils to live healthier lifestyles.

- See STC/HDC conference report, page 25.


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