Russia substitutes home-grown produce for imports

Russia has cut back significantly on domestic fresh produce growing in recent years, filling the gap with increased imports, new figures show.

Russian farm - image: Johan Viirok
Russian farm - image: Johan Viirok
The area under vegetable cultivation fell nearly 20 per cent from 2004 to 2010, to 759,000 hectares, with yield declining by 11 per cent in the same period, according to the Dutch Product Board for Horticulture.

Fruit production declined even more sharply, by 43 per cent in area and by 37 per cent in production, with the area under apple and pear orchards falling by half.

At the same time, vegetable imports rose 91 per cent over the period, while fruit imports rose 86 per cent. The main supplier countries were Turkey, China, the Netherlands, Poland and Israel.


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